Civil Engineering Online Courses

Free Structural Engineering Online Courses

Engineering Mechanics I

  • Level: Undergraduate
  • University: MIT
  • Format: syllabus, lecture notes, assignments
  • Description: This subject provides an introduction to the mechanics of materials and structures. You will be introduced to and become familiar with all relevant physical properties and fundamental laws governing the behavior of materials and structures and you will learn how to solve a variety of problems of interest to civil and environmental engineers. While there will be a chance for you to put your mathematical skills obtained in 18.01, 18.02, and eventually 18.03 to use in this subject, the emphasis is on the physical understanding of why a material or structure behaves the way it does in the engineering design of materials and structures.
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Solid Mechanics

  • Level: Undergraduate
  • University: MIT
  • Format: syllabus, lecture notes, assignments, readings, tools, videos
  • Description: This subject is a sophomore-level engineering mechanics course, commonly labelled “Statics and Strength of Materials” or “Solid Mechanics I.” This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and methods of structural mechanics. Topics covered include: static equilibrium, force resultants, support conditions, analysis of determinate planar structures (beams, trusses, frames), stresses and strains in structural elements, states of stress (shear, bending, torsion), statically indeterminate systems, displacements and deformations, introduction to matrix methods, elastic stability, and approximate methods. Design exercises are used to encourage creative student initiative and systems thinking.
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Structural Engineering Design

  • Level: Undergraduate
  • University: MIT
  • Format: syllabus, lecture notes, assignments, readings, videos
  • Description: This course aims at providing students with a solid background on the principles of structural engineering design. Students will be exposed to the theories and concepts of both concrete and steel design and analysis both at the element and system levels. Hands-on design experience and skills will be gained and learned through problem sets and a comprehensive design project. An understanding of real-world open-ended design issues will be developed. Besides regular lectures, weekly recitations and project discussion sessions will be held.
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Dynamics and Control I

  • Level: Undergraduate
  • University: MIT
  • Format: syllabus, lecture notes, assignments, exams, readings
  • Description: Introduction to the dynamics and vibrations of lumped-parameter models of mechanical systems. Kinematics. Force-momentum formulation for systems of particles and rigid bodies in planar motion. Work-energy concepts. Virtual displacements and virtual work. Lagrange’s equations for systems of particles and rigid bodies in planar motion. Linearization of equations of motion. Linear stability analysis of mechanical systems. Free and forced vibration of linear multi-degree of freedom models of mechanical systems; matrix eigenvalue problems. Introduction to numerical methods and MATLABĀ® to solve dynamics and vibrations problems.
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Dynamics and Vibration

  • Level: Undergraduate
  • University: MIT
  • Format: syllabus, lecture notes, assignments, exams, readings
  • Description: Introduction to dynamics and vibration of lumped-parameter models of mechanical systems. Three-dimensional particle kinematics. Force-momentum formulation for systems of particles and for rigid bodies (direct method). Newton-Euler equations. Work-energy (variational) formulation for systems particles and for rigid bodies (indirect method). Virtual displacements and work. Lagrange’s equations for systems of particles and for rigid bodies. Linearization of equations of motion. Linear stability analysis of mechanical systems. Free and forced vibration of linear damped lumped parameter multi-degree of freedom models of mechanical systems. Application to the design of ocean and civil engineering structures such as tension leg platforms.
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Mechanics and Design of Concrete Structures

  • Level: Undergraduate/Graduate
  • University: MIT
  • Format: syllabus, lecture notes, assignments, exams, readings
  • Description: The main objective of 1.054/1.541 is to provide students with a rational basis of the design of reinforced concrete members and structures through advanced understanding of material and structural behavior. This course is offered to undergraduate (1.054) and graduate students (1.541). Topics covered include: Strength and Deformation of Concrete under Various States of Stress; Failure Criteria; Concrete Plasticity; Fracture Mechanics Concepts; Fundamental Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Structural Systems and their Members; Basis for Design and Code Constraints; High-performance Concrete Materials and their use in Innovative Design Solutions; Slabs: Yield Line Theory; Behavior Models and Nonlinear Analysis; and Complex Systems: Bridge Structures, Concrete Shells, and Containments.
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Engineering Mechanics II

  • Level: Undergraduate
  • University: MIT
  • Format: syllabus, lecture notes, assignments, exams, readings
  • Description: This subject provides an introduction to fluid mechanics. Students are introduced to and become familiar with all relevant physical properties and fundamental laws governing the behavior of fluids and learn how to solve a variety of problems of interest to civil and environmental engineers. While there is a chance to put skills from calculus and differential equations to use in this subject, the emphasis is on physical understanding of why a fluid behaves the way it does. The aim is to make the students think as a fluid. In addition to relating a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, the subject prepares students for higher-level subjects in fluid dynamics.
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Structural Mechanics in Nuclear Power Technology

  • Level: Graduate
  • University: MIT
  • Format: syllabus, lecture notes, assignments, exams, readings
  • Description: This course deals with structural components in nuclear power plant systems, their functional purposes, operating conditions, and mechanical-structural design requirements. It combines mechanics techniques with models of material behavior to determine adequacy of component design. Considerations include mechanical loading, brittle fracture, in-elastic behavior, elevated temperatures, neutron irradiation, and seismic effects.
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Mechanics of Material Systems: An Energy Approach

  • Level: Undergraduate/Graduate
  • University: MIT
  • Format: syllabus, lecture notes, assignments, exams, readings
  • Description: This subject provides an introduction to continuum mechanics and material modeling of engineering materials based on first energy principles: deformation and strain; momentum balance, stress and stress states; elasticity and elasticity bounds; plasticity and yield design. The overarching theme is a unified mechanistic language using thermodynamics, which allows understanding, modeling and design of a large range of engineering materials. This course is offered both to undergraduate (1.033) and graduate (1.57) students.
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Structural Analysis and Control

  • Level: Graduate
  • University: MIT
  • Format: syllabus, lecture notes, assignments, exams, readings
  • Description: This course uses computer-based methods for the analysis of large-scale structural systems. Topics covered include: modeling strategies for complex structures; application to tall buildings, cable-stayed bridges, and tension structures; introduction to the theory of active structural control; design of classical feedback control systems for civil structures; and simulation studies using customized computer software.
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Structural Mechanics

  • Level: Graduate
  • University: MIT
  • Format: syllabus, lecture notes, assignments, readings
  • Description: Fundamental concepts of structural mechanics with applications to marine, civil, and mechanical structures. Residual stresses. Thermal effects. Analysis of beams, columns, tensioned beams, trusses, frames, cables, and shafts of general shape and material, including composites. Elastic buckling of columns. Exact and approximate methods, energy methods, principle of virtual work, introduction to computational structural mechanics. Examples from civil, mechanical, offshore, and ship structures.
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Engineering Statics

  • Level: Undergraduate
  • University: Carnegie Mellon University
  • Format: syllabus, assignments
  • Description: Statics is the study of methods for quantifying the forces between bodies. Forces are responsible for maintaining balance and causing motion of bodies, or changes in their shape. You encounter a great number and variety of examples of forces every day, such as when you press a button, turn a doorknob, or run your hands through your hair. Motion and changes in shape are critical to the functionality of man-made objects as well as objects the nature.
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Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis


Stochastic Structural Dynamics


Advanced Structural Analysis


Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures


Design Of Steel Structures


Structural Analysis II


Prestressed Concrete Structures


Mechanics of Solids


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